New UN Publications: October 2019

“Just Societies: Health Equity and Dignified Lives – Report of the Commission of the Pan American Health Organization of Equity and Health Inequalities in the Americas.”
Inequity lies at the very heart of poor health outcomes in the Americas and must be urgently addressed if the Region is to achieve health for all. The report proposes priority goals across a range of action areas to reduce inequities in health. According to the report, much of the Region’s poor health outcomes are determined not by biology but by social structures that perpetuate unequal access to education, decent work, income and social protection, to name just a few. The report makes 12 recommendations for action by the countries of the Americas. The recommendations as a whole propose a renewed focus on groups most left behind, a whole-of-government approach to addressing inequality, and collaboration with other sectors beyond health.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WHO
ISBN: 978-92-75-12126-9
pp. 304

 

 

“Disaster Risk Reduction in the Philippines, Status Report (July 2019).”
In terms of disaster risk, Philippines ranked third among all of the countries with the highest risks worldwide according to the World Risk Report 2018, with index value of 25.14% (World Economic Forum, 2018). At least 60% of the country’s total land area is exposed to multiple hazards, and 74% of the population is susceptible to their impact (GFDRR, 2017). Also, as the islands are located within the “Ring of Fire” between the Eurasian and Pacific tectonic plates, earthquakes and volcanoes are posing serious risks to the safety of the populace. Flooding, landslides, droughts and tsunamis further contribute to the exposure to natural hazards (CFE-DM, 2018).
Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNDRR
pp. 31

 

 

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on International Day for Persons with Disabilities, 3 December 2019

When we secure the rights of people with disabilities, we move closer to achieving the central promise of the 2030 Agenda – to leave no one behind.

While we still have much to do, we have seen important progress in building an inclusive world for all.

Almost all United Nations Member States have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and I urge those who have not yet done so to ratify it without delay.

In June, I launched the United Nations Disability Inclusion Strategy, to raise our standards and performance on disability inclusion, across all areas of our work and around the world.

And for the first time, the Security Council adopted its first-ever resolution dedicated on the protection of persons with disabilities in armed conflict.

We are determined to lead by example.

On this International Day, I reaffirm the commitment of the United Nations to work with people with disabilities to build a sustainable, inclusive and transformative future in which everyone, including women, men, girls and boys with disabilities, can realize their potential.

Thank you. [Ends]

Watch the Secretary-General’s video message here: https://s3.amazonaws.com/downloads2.unmultimedia.org/public/video/ondemand/MSG%20SG%20INTL%20DAY%20PERSONS%20WITH%20DISABILITIES%20CLEAN%203%20Dec%20%2019.mp4

UN Secretary-General’s Message on Human Rights Day, 10 December 2019

(THEME: YOUTH STANDING UP FOR HUMAN RIGHTS)

This year, on Human Rights Day, we celebrate the role of young people in bringing human rights to life.

Globally, young people are marching, organizing, and speaking out:

For the right to a healthy environment…

For the equal rights of women and girls…

To participate in decision-making…

And to express their opinions freely…

They are marching for their right to a future of peace, justice and equal opportunities.

Every single person is entitled to all rights: civil, political, economic, social and cultural. Regardless of where they live. Regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, social origin, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinion, disability or income, or any other status.

On this International Day, I call on everyone to support and protect young people who are standing up for human rights. [Ends]

 

New UN Publications: September 2019

“Global Sustainable Development Report 2019 – The Future is Now: Science for Achieving Sustainable Development.”
The Global Sustainable Development Report reflects the universal, indivisible and integrated nature of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It also seeks to strengthen the science-policy interface as an evidence-based instrument to support policymakers and other stakeholders in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda across the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. It highlights state-of-the-art knowledge for transformations towards sustainable development and identifies concrete areas where rapid, transformational change is possible. It uses the latest scientific assessments, evidence bases about good practices, and scenarios that link future trajectories to current actions to identify calls to action by a range of stakeholders that can accelerate progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNDESA
pp. 216

 

 

“Trends in Maternal Mortality (2000 -2017).”
This report presents global, regional and country-level estimates and trends for maternal mortality between 2000 and 2017. It provides the definitions of key terms and describes the key measures relevant to maternal mortality. It also describes in detail the methodology employed to develop the estimates and presents the estimates and trends at the global, regional and country levels.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WHO
ISBN: 978-92-4-151648-8
pp. 104

 

 

“Levels and Trends in Child Mortality – United Nations Inter-Agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME), Report 2019.”
This report presents UNIGME’s latest estimates – through 2018 – of neonatal, infant and under-five mortality as well as mortality among children aged 5–14 years. It assesses progress in the reduction of child and young adolescent mortality at the country, regional and global levels, and provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the mortality indicators above.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UN IGME
pp. 50

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on World AIDS Day, 1 December 2019

Ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030, as we committed to in the Sustainable Development Goals, will require a continuous collaborative effort. The United Nations, Governments, civil society and other partners have been working together to scale up access to health services and to halt new HIV infections. More than 23 million people living with HIV were receiving treatment in 2018.

Communities around the world are at the heart of this response―helping people to claim their rights, promoting access to stigma-free health and social services, ensuring that services reach the most vulnerable and marginalized, and pressing to change laws that discriminate.  As the theme of this year’s observance rightly highlights, communities make the difference.

Yet unmet needs remain. A record 38 million people are living with HIV, and resources for the response to the epidemic declined by $1 billion last year. More than ever we need to harness the role of community-led organizations that advocate for their peers, deliver HIV services, defend human rights and provide support.

Where communities are engaged, we see change happen. We see investment lead to results. And we see equality, respect and dignity.

With communities, we can end AIDS.

by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

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New UN Publications: August 2019

“UN Climate Change Annual Report 2018.”
With the adoption of the Katowice climate package at COP 24, the world entered a new era in its collective efforts to address climate change. This Report illustrates the key achievements of the UNFCCC process and the activities of the secretariat, particularly their impact in relation to the implementation of the Convention, the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. The report also summarizes the outcomes of COP and provides a look at the years ahead.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNHCR
ISBN: 978-92-9219-184-9
pp. 58

 

 

“National systems to support drinking-water, sanitation and hygiene – Global status report 2019.”
After four years of SDG implementation, globally, over 2 billion people still rely on unsafe water, and 4.2 billion use sanitation facilities that allow their excreta to leak untreated into the environment. Many of the 115 countries and territories surveyed by the 2018/2019 UN-Water Global Analysis and Assessment of Sanitation and Drinking-Water (GLAAS) survey are taking steps to achieve SDG 6. About half of them have set targets that aim for universal WASH coverage by 2030, and there are numerous examples of governments specifically targeting open defecation, which will have a dramatic impact on public and environmental health.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WHO / UN Water
ISBN: 978-92-4-151629-7
pp. 121

 

 

“MENA Generation 2030 – Investing in children and youth today to secure a prosperous region tomorrow.”
This report aims to provide an in-depth analysis of demographic projections for children, adolescents and youth in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region 5 highlighting the significant changes and exploring their implications for policy-making and programming in the areas of health, protection, education, transition to employment, civic engagement and the empowerment of girls and women in the region.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNICEF
pp. 110

 

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists, 2 November 2019

Freedom of expression and free media are essential to fostering understanding, bolstering democracy and advancing our efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

In recent years, however, there has been a rise in the scale and number of attacks against the physical safety of journalists and media workers, and of incidents infringing upon their ability to do their vital work, including threats of prosecution, arrest, imprisonment, denial of journalistic access and failures to investigate and prosecute crimes against them.

The proportion of women among fatalities has also risen, and women journalists increasingly face gendered forms of violence, such as sexual harassment, sexual assault and threats.

When journalists are targeted, societies as a whole pay a price.  Without the ability to protect journalists, our ability to remain informed and contribute to decision-making is severely hampered.  Without journalists able to do their jobs in safety, we face the prospect of a world of confusion and disinformation.

On this International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists, let us stand up together for journalists, for truth and for justice.

[Ends]

 

UN Secretary-General’s Message on World Cities Day, 31 October 2019

More than half the world’s population now lives in urban areas. By 2050, two thirds will do so. Much of what will be needed to house and serve this increasingly urban world has yet to be constructed, and even some new cities will need to be built. This brings enormous opportunities to develop and implement solutions that can address the climate crisis and pave the way toward a sustainable future.

Cities consume more than two-thirds of the world’s energy, and account for more than 70 per cent of global carbon dioxide emissions. The choices that will be made on urban infrastructure in the coming decades – on urban planning, energy efficiency, power generation and transport – will have decisive influence on the emissions curve. Indeed, cities are where the climate battle will largely be won or lost.

But in addition to their enormous climate footprint, cities generate more than 80 per cent of global gross domestic product and, as centers of education and entrepreneurship, they are hubs of innovation and creativity, with young people often taking the lead.

From electric public transport to renewable energy and better waste management, many of the answers needed for the transition to a sustainable, low-emission future are already available. Cities around the world are turning them into a reality.  It is encouraging to see this happening, but we need this vision to become the new norm. Now is the time for ambitious action.

World Cities Day comes at the end of “urban October”, a month dedicated to raising awareness on urban challenges, successes and sustainability. As we conclude this period, let us commit to embracing innovation to ensure a better life for future generations and chart a path towards sustainable, inclusive urban development that benefits all.

[Ends]

Message of the United Nations Resident Coordinator in the Philippines on United Nations Day 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Department of Foreign Affairs for coming together with us at the United Nations, in this traditional celebration of UN Day here in Manila.  A special thank you to Foreign Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr for taking time from his very busy schedule to join in person [alt who represents him].  And thank you to all our guests for contributing to this evening with your presence.  To SM for allowing us to use this beautiful hall at no cost, and last but certainly not least, to my colleagues who have worked very hard with our friends and colleagues in DFA to prepare this evening for us.

Tonight, is a celebration of the 74th anniversary of the ratification of the UN Charter, on 24 October 1945.  This of course followed the conclusion of the San Francisco conference on 26 June the same year with the signing of the Charter by 50 of its 51 charter members (Poland would sign two months later), and with the Philippines as a Charter member represented by the Honorable Carlos P. Romulo – who later went on to become the President of the fourth session of the United Nations General Assembly in 1949 to 1950!

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, 17 October 2019

Ending extreme poverty is at the heart of the world’s efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and build a sustainable future for all.  But success in leaving no one behind will remain elusive if we do not target the people who are farthest behind first.

This year’s observance focuses on “acting together to empower children, their families and communities to end poverty”, as we mark the 30th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Children are more than twice as likely to live in extreme poverty than adults.  Poverty condemns many children to lifelong disadvantage and perpetuates an intergenerational transfer of deprivation.  Today’s children will also live with the devastating consequences of climate change if we fail to raise ambition now.

From conflict zones to cyberspace, from forced labour to sexual exploitation, girls are at particular risk, but they are also a force for change. For every additional year a girl remains in school, her average income over a lifetime increases, her chances of being married early decrease, and there are clear health and education benefits for her children, making it a key factor in breaking the cycle of poverty.

One of the keys to ending child poverty is addressing poverty in the household, from which it often stems. Access to quality social services must be a priority, yet today, almost two-thirds of children lack social protection coverage.  Family-oriented policies are also indispensable, including flexible working arrangements, parental leave and childcare support.

On this International Day, let us recommit to achieving Sustainable Development Goal 1 and a fair globalization that works for all children, their families and communities. [Ends]