New UN Publications: December 2019

“Global Humanitarian Overview 2020.”
In 2019, donors provided a record $16 billion for inter-agency appeals between January and November 2019. Yet, compliance with international law is declining. Armed conflicts are killing and maiming a record number of children. Women and girls are at higher risk of sexual and gender-based violence. One in five people living in conflict areas has a mental health condition. In 2020, nearly 168 million people will need humanitarian assistance and protection. This represents one in about 45 people in the world, and is the highest figure in decades. The United Nations and partner organizations aim to assist nearly 109 million of the most vulnerable people. This will require funding of $28.8 billion.
ABRIDGED version

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNOCHA
pp. 87

 

 

“Climate Action Report 2019.”
The Climate Action Report 2019 provides an overview of IFAD’s work on climate change and reports on progress, challenges and achievements in every work area where climate is accounted for within IFAD’s efforts towards improving the livelihoods of poor rural people. This year’s report highlights how climate change effects are considered and acted upon within the IFAD project cycle. It starts at the inception of developing country strategies and continues through the design, implementation and financing of projects to the assessment of impacts.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: IFAD
ISBN: 978-92-9072-956-3
pp. 89

 

 

“Emissions Gap Report 2019: Global progress report on climate action.”
The Emissions Gap Report 2019 shows that we are on the brink of missing the 1.5°C target and condemning humanity to a future of serious climate change impacts. Countries cannot wait until they submit their updated Paris pledges in one year’s time to act. They need to do much more, starting now. Cities, regions, businesses and individuals must all play their part too. We simply cannot afford inaction. For ourselves, for our countries, for our future.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNEP
ISBN: 978-92-807-3766-0
pp. 81

 

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New UN Publications: November 2019

“World Migration Report 2020.”
The World Migration Report 2020, the tenth in the world migration report series, has been produced to contribute to increased understanding of migration throughout the world. This new edition presents key data and information on migration as well as thematic chapters on highly topical migration issues, and is structured to focus on two key contributions for readers: Part I: key information on migration and migrants (including migration-related statistics); and Part II: balanced, evidence-based analysis of complex and emerging migration issues.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: IOM
ISBN: 978-92-9068-789-4
pp. 475

 

 

“Parliaments as partners supporting the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.”
The women, peace and security agenda remain critically important in a world that grapples with complex conflict. Women suffered a range of harms, from sexual and gender-based violence inflicted by combatants, to the loss of their spouses and families, to the loss of their livelihoods and personal autonomy. The participation of parliaments in efforts to support the women, peace and security agenda has been variable, with many parliaments either unaware of or uninvolved in national implementation efforts. This Handbook seeks to provide guidance to parliamentarians on their role in supporting the UNSCR 1325 agenda.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNDP
pp. 51

 

 

“Addressing Climate-Fragility Risks.”
This climate-fragility risks guidance note seeks to inform the development and implementation of strategies, policies, or projects that seek to build resilience by linking climate change adaptation, peacebuilding, and sustainable livelihoods. It recommends a two-step approach to build resilience to climate-fragility risks. Throughout the note, checklists and guiding questions help readers put these concepts and approaches into action. In addition, a separate monitoring and evaluation (M&E) note provides guidance for measuring the effectiveness of these efforts; and a toolbox lists further reading and additional tools.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNEP
pp. [70]

 

 

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UN Secretary-General’s Video Message on International Migrants Day, 18 December 2019

 

Video link:

https://bit.ly/35rJvSX

[Text of the Secretary-General’s video message]

Migrants are integral members of society, contributing to mutual understanding and sustainable development in communities of both origin and destination.

Safe, orderly and regular migration is in the interest of all. And national priorities on migration are best achieved through international cooperation.

All migrants are entitled to equal protection of all their human rights.

These principles are enshrined in the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

Yet, we often hear narratives around migrants that are harmful and false.

And we often witness migrants facing unspeakable hardship as a result of policies shaped more by fear than by fact.

On this International Day, I urge leaders and people everywhere to bring the Global Compact to life, so that migration works for all.

[Ends]

UN Secretary-General’s Message on International Universal Health Coverage Day, 12 December 2019

This past September at the United Nations, world leaders endorsed an ambitious political declaration on universal health coverage, reaffirming that health is a human right.  The agreement is a significant achievement that will drive progress over the next decade on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

On this International Universal Health Coverage Day, I call on leaders to keep the promise and ensure health for all is a reality for everyone, everywhere.

While more people are accessing essential health services than ever before, far too many still miss out.  It is unacceptable and unjust that half of the world’s population still lacks access to these essential services and 100 million people are driven into extreme poverty every year due to healthcare costs.

A person’s health coverage should never depend on their wealth or where they may live.

On our path to health for all, we must prioritize the needs of those most vulnerable and furthest behind, through increased public investment in resilient primary health care systems, including for mental health needs. We must also recognize the increasing burden that pollution and the climate crisis place on health and healthcare systems.

Universal health coverage is integral to delivering the Sustainable Development Goals, our blueprint of a better future for people and planet.  On this International Day, let us reaffirm our commitment to health for all as an investment in humanity, wellbeing and prosperity for everyone.

[Ends]

 

Statement by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, 10 December 2019

GENEVA (9 December 2019) – This has been a year of tremendous activism – notably by young people. It is particularly fitting that this year we mark Human Rights Day during the crucial UN conference in Madrid to uphold climate justice. We owe a debt of gratitude to all those millions of children, teenagers and young adults who have been standing up and speaking out more and more loudly about the crisis facing our planet.

Rightly, these young people are pointing out that it is their future which is at stake, and the future of all those who have not yet even been born. It is they who will have to bear the full consequences of the actions, or lack of action, by the older generations who currently run governments and businesses, the decision-makers on whom the future of individual countries, regions and the planet as whole depends.

It cannot, of course, be left to young people alone to tackle the climate emergency, or indeed the many other human rights crises that are currently causing simultaneous turbulence in so many countries across the world. All of us must stand together, in solidarity, and act with principle and urgency.

We can, and must, uphold the painstakingly developed universal human rights principles that sustain peace, justice and sustainable development. A world with diminished human rights is a world that is stepping backwards into a darker past, when the powerful could prey on the powerless with little or no moral or legal restraint.

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New UN Publications: October 2019

“Just Societies: Health Equity and Dignified Lives – Report of the Commission of the Pan American Health Organization of Equity and Health Inequalities in the Americas.”
Inequity lies at the very heart of poor health outcomes in the Americas and must be urgently addressed if the Region is to achieve health for all. The report proposes priority goals across a range of action areas to reduce inequities in health. According to the report, much of the Region’s poor health outcomes are determined not by biology but by social structures that perpetuate unequal access to education, decent work, income and social protection, to name just a few. The report makes 12 recommendations for action by the countries of the Americas. The recommendations as a whole propose a renewed focus on groups most left behind, a whole-of-government approach to addressing inequality, and collaboration with other sectors beyond health.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WHO
ISBN: 978-92-75-12126-9
pp. 304

 

 

“Disaster Risk Reduction in the Philippines, Status Report (July 2019).”
In terms of disaster risk, Philippines ranked third among all of the countries with the highest risks worldwide according to the World Risk Report 2018, with index value of 25.14% (World Economic Forum, 2018). At least 60% of the country’s total land area is exposed to multiple hazards, and 74% of the population is susceptible to their impact (GFDRR, 2017). Also, as the islands are located within the “Ring of Fire” between the Eurasian and Pacific tectonic plates, earthquakes and volcanoes are posing serious risks to the safety of the populace. Flooding, landslides, droughts and tsunamis further contribute to the exposure to natural hazards (CFE-DM, 2018).
Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNDRR
pp. 31

 

 

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on International Day for Persons with Disabilities, 3 December 2019

When we secure the rights of people with disabilities, we move closer to achieving the central promise of the 2030 Agenda – to leave no one behind.

While we still have much to do, we have seen important progress in building an inclusive world for all.

Almost all United Nations Member States have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and I urge those who have not yet done so to ratify it without delay.

In June, I launched the United Nations Disability Inclusion Strategy, to raise our standards and performance on disability inclusion, across all areas of our work and around the world.

And for the first time, the Security Council adopted its first-ever resolution dedicated on the protection of persons with disabilities in armed conflict.

We are determined to lead by example.

On this International Day, I reaffirm the commitment of the United Nations to work with people with disabilities to build a sustainable, inclusive and transformative future in which everyone, including women, men, girls and boys with disabilities, can realize their potential.

Thank you. [Ends]

Watch the Secretary-General’s video message here: https://s3.amazonaws.com/downloads2.unmultimedia.org/public/video/ondemand/MSG%20SG%20INTL%20DAY%20PERSONS%20WITH%20DISABILITIES%20CLEAN%203%20Dec%20%2019.mp4

UN Secretary-General’s Message on Human Rights Day, 10 December 2019

(THEME: YOUTH STANDING UP FOR HUMAN RIGHTS)

This year, on Human Rights Day, we celebrate the role of young people in bringing human rights to life.

Globally, young people are marching, organizing, and speaking out:

For the right to a healthy environment…

For the equal rights of women and girls…

To participate in decision-making…

And to express their opinions freely…

They are marching for their right to a future of peace, justice and equal opportunities.

Every single person is entitled to all rights: civil, political, economic, social and cultural. Regardless of where they live. Regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, social origin, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinion, disability or income, or any other status.

On this International Day, I call on everyone to support and protect young people who are standing up for human rights. [Ends]

Watch the Secretary-General’s video message here: https://vimeo.com/377264084

 

New UN Publications: September 2019

“Global Sustainable Development Report 2019 – The Future is Now: Science for Achieving Sustainable Development.”
The Global Sustainable Development Report reflects the universal, indivisible and integrated nature of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It also seeks to strengthen the science-policy interface as an evidence-based instrument to support policymakers and other stakeholders in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda across the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. It highlights state-of-the-art knowledge for transformations towards sustainable development and identifies concrete areas where rapid, transformational change is possible. It uses the latest scientific assessments, evidence bases about good practices, and scenarios that link future trajectories to current actions to identify calls to action by a range of stakeholders that can accelerate progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNDESA
pp. 216

 

 

“Trends in Maternal Mortality (2000 -2017).”
This report presents global, regional and country-level estimates and trends for maternal mortality between 2000 and 2017. It provides the definitions of key terms and describes the key measures relevant to maternal mortality. It also describes in detail the methodology employed to develop the estimates and presents the estimates and trends at the global, regional and country levels.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WHO
ISBN: 978-92-4-151648-8
pp. 104

 

 

“Levels and Trends in Child Mortality – United Nations Inter-Agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME), Report 2019.”
This report presents UNIGME’s latest estimates – through 2018 – of neonatal, infant and under-five mortality as well as mortality among children aged 5–14 years. It assesses progress in the reduction of child and young adolescent mortality at the country, regional and global levels, and provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the mortality indicators above.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UN IGME
pp. 50

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on World AIDS Day, 1 December 2019

Ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030, as we committed to in the Sustainable Development Goals, will require a continuous collaborative effort. The United Nations, Governments, civil society and other partners have been working together to scale up access to health services and to halt new HIV infections. More than 23 million people living with HIV were receiving treatment in 2018.

Communities around the world are at the heart of this response―helping people to claim their rights, promoting access to stigma-free health and social services, ensuring that services reach the most vulnerable and marginalized, and pressing to change laws that discriminate.  As the theme of this year’s observance rightly highlights, communities make the difference.

Yet unmet needs remain. A record 38 million people are living with HIV, and resources for the response to the epidemic declined by $1 billion last year. More than ever we need to harness the role of community-led organizations that advocate for their peers, deliver HIV services, defend human rights and provide support.

Where communities are engaged, we see change happen. We see investment lead to results. And we see equality, respect and dignity.

With communities, we can end AIDS.

by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

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