New UN Publications: July 2019

“Youth Advocacy Guide.”
This Guide intends to help us navigate through the various processes to advocate for change. It also aims to lead you through the process of advocacy, combining clear ‘how to’ steps in getting involved. It also includes inspirational stories from other young people who are striving to bring about change in their communities. These stories of triumphs and challenges, ranging from preventing child marriage to inspiring environmental activism, it reminds us that we are not alone.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNICEF
pp. 51

 

 

“Refugees In Turkey: Livelihoods Survey Findings 2019.”
Turkey has the largest refugee population of any country in the world, with 3.6 million Syrians registered. The Livelihoods Survey was developed to provide additional evidence and inform the design of the transition from basic needs assistance to more sustainable livelihoods opportunities for refugees in Turkey. The majority of refugees are already working, however they are primarily working informally with unreliable access to work and low wages. This survey is representative of the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN) applicants within the 19 provinces included in the survey. This is equivalent to a total of 413,025 households, including approximately 2.4 million people.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: WFP/Turk Kizilay
pp. 46

 

 

 

“UNICEF Supply Annual Report 2018.”
Procuring supplies for children is not as simple as buying products off the shelf: it requires a complex orchestration of efforts among many partners. In 2018, UNICEF procured $3.486 billion worth of goods and services from over 11,000 businesses. The report highlights achievements on strategies employed to accomplish shared value for children. It also draws attention to the opportunities where further value can be created for children and young people.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNICEF
pp. 119

 

 

 

“Child Labour in Agriculture: The demand side (Lebanon).”
Worldwide, agriculture comprises the largest share of child labour. Agriculture has been identified by the ILO as one of the three most dangerous sectors, together with construction and mining. In 2013, a National Action Plan (NAP) was developed to eliminate the worst forms of child labour by 2016 in Lebanon. This study examines the characteristics and working conditions of children aged between 5 and 17 years who are working in the agriculture sector in Lebanon. The research was based on (1) a desk review; (2) a survey of 422 farmers who employ children; and (3) in-depth interviews with 90 participants, including farmers who employ children, and children who work on farms.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: FAO/UNICEF
ISBN: 978-92-5-131252-0
pp. 65

 

 

UN Secretary-General’s Remarks at UN Staff Day, 6 September 2019, in New York

Dear colleagues,

Ladies and gentlemen,

I am pleased to be with you once again to celebrate Staff Day and the dedicated women and men who make up our United Nations family.

Let me also commend the President of the Staff Union, Patricia Nemeth, and her staff for the effort put into organizing this day and representing the interests of the staff year-round.

As I said, we are a family, bound by the common desire to do good and breathe life into the values and principles of the United Nations as set out in our founding Charter.

We do this all around the world, often in some of the most challenging and dangerous environments.

And so, it is our duty today – and every day – to remember and commemorate our fallen colleagues.

So far this year, we have lost 25 civilian staff, 43 peacekeepers and 4 police.

Our sympathy goes to their families and friends who feel their loss so keenly.

Let us remember the sacrifice our fallen colleagues made in working to make the world safer and more dignified for those less fortunate than themselves.

And let us honour their memory by rededicating ourselves to their mission.

All around the world, United Nations staff are working to fulfil the promise of the Sustainable Development Goals to leave no one behind.

From addressing acute humanitarian needs to working on long-term development, from keeping the peace to defending human rights, from feeding the hungry to helping build resilience to climate change, United Nations staff are working on the front lines of today’s most pressing challenges.

You are my colleagues, and I am constantly made proud of the work you do, in the field and at our headquarter duty stations, saving lives and building hope.

For many of us, we are now entering a particularly busy period as the new General Assembly looms.

This year we have five important high-level meetings focused on adding impetus to our global goals: the Climate Action Summit; the High-Level Meeting on Universal health coverage; the SDG Summit; a high-level dialogue on financing for development; and a high-level meeting on Small Island Developing States.

We also have the usual broad schedule of high-level meetings and side events that will keep us all busy.

So, before we work, let us enjoy ourselves.

Each of you is a talented staff member.  But I know many of you have other talents that will be on display here today.

So, let me wish you and your families a happy Staff Day.

Thank you.

UN Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day of Democracy, 15 September

At heart, democracy is about people.  It is built on inclusion, equal treatment and participation — and it is a fundamental building block for peace, sustainable development and human rights.

These values and aspirations cannot be seen as tokens or lip service.  They must be real in people’s lives.

Yet the International Day of Democracy takes place at a time when trust is low and anxiety is high.

People are frustrated by growing inequalities and unsettled by sweeping changes from globalization and technology.

They see conflicts going unresolved, a climate emergency going unanswered, injustice going unaddressed, and civic space shrinking.

As we mark Democracy Day, I urge all governments to respect the right to active, substantive and meaningful participation; and I salute all of you who strive tirelessly to make this happen.

 

UN Secretary-General’s Message on World Humanitarian Day, 19 August 2019

World Humanitarian Day honours aid workers around the world who risk their own lives to help save and improve the lives of others. This year, we pay special tribute to women humanitarians and the huge difference they make for millions of women, men and children in urgent need.

From supporting civilians caught up in crisis to addressing disease outbreaks, women humanitarians are on the front lines. Their presence makes aid operations more effective by increasing their reach. It also improves the humanitarian response to gender-based violence, which increases during emergencies. Today, and for the rest of this month, we invite you to share their powerful stories through your online and social media platforms. In doing so, we reaffirm our common commitment to strengthening the role of women in humanitarian operations.

World leaders, and all parties to conflict, must ensure that humanitarians are protected from harm, as required under international law. Serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law continue around the world. They must be investigated and prosecuted.

On World Humanitarian Day and every day, we stand up for humanitarian workers around the world.

Watch the Secretary-General’s video message here: https://bit.ly/2KZtTiQ

 

UN Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day against Nuclear Tests, 29 August 2019

The International Day against Nuclear Tests marks the closing, in 1991, of the nuclear test site in Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, the largest in the former Soviet Union. More than 450 tests took place there, with impacts still being felt decades later.

But this observance also has a broader message. It commemorates all victims of nuclear tests, anywhere they have been conducted. Affected communities have yet to fully recover from the environmental, health and economic damage.

Honoring those victims requires bringing nuclear testing to a permanent end. Yet, an effective and legally-binding prohibition remains one of the longest unfulfilled goals of nuclear disarmament. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is a central pillar of international efforts, but despite being widely supported – with 184 signatories and 168 ratifying States – it has not yet entered into force, more than 20 years after its adoption.

The legacy of nuclear testing is nothing but destruction. The CTBT is vital to ensuring there are no more victims; it is also essential to advancing nuclear disarmament.

On the International Day Against Nuclear Tests, I reiterate my call for all States that have not yet done so, to sign and ratify the Treaty, especially those whose ratification is needed for the Treaty’s entry into force. In a world of rising tensions and divisions, our collective security depends on it.

New UN Publications: June 2019

“World Drug Report 2019 Exec Summary.”
In 2017, an estimated 271 million people, or 5.5 per cent of the global population aged 15–64, had used drugs in the previous year. The Report 2019 aims to shed light on the world drug problem and inform international community responses. The findings of this year’s World Drug Report will fill in and further complicate the global picture of drug challenges, underscoring the need for broader international cooperation to advance balanced and integrated health and criminal justice responses to drug supply and demand.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNODC
ISBN: 978-92-1-148314-7
pp. 53

 

 

“FAO framework on rural extreme poverty – Towards reaching Target 1.1 of the Sustainable Development Goals.”
The Rural Extreme Poverty Framework of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is the outcome of an extensive internal and external discussion on the strategic role of FAO in supporting its Member Countries to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Recognizing this, the Corporate Framework on Rural Extreme Poverty has been established to orient the relevant work of the Organization towards reaching Target 1.1 of the SDGs.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: FAO
ISBN: 978-92-5-131506-4
pp. 46

 

 

“Global Trends: Forced Displacement in 2018.”
The global population of forcibly displaced increased by 2.3 million people in 2018. By the end of the year, almost 70.8 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, violence, or human rights violations. As a result, the world’s forcibly displaced population remained yet again at a record high.

Bibliographic info:
Publisher: UNHCR
pp. 75

 

 

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Second chances

By Ola Almgren

In 2002, 19-year-old Radam Jalani, who lived in the small seaside village of Mercedes in Zamboanga City, was resigned to being a seaweed farmer for the rest of his life. When he was 12 years old, Radam’s father asked him to quit school to help his family scrape out a living from planting seaweed. The 10 years that followed stretched out like a lifetime for Radam, taking him farther and farther away from school. And yet, just six years after contemplating a future he thought he could not escape, Radam began to live the life he had chosen for himself.

Radam returned to school. As a teacher.

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IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land

Land is a Critical Resource, IPCC report says
It is under pressure from humans and climate change, but it is part of the solution

GENEVA, Aug 8 – Land is already under growing human pressure and climate change is adding to these pressures. At the same time, keeping global warming to well below 2oC can be achieved only by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors including land and food, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said in its latest report on Thursday.

The IPCC, the world body for assessing the state of scientific knowledge related to climate change, its impacts and potential future risks, and possible response options, saw the Summary for Policymakers of the Special Report on Climate Change and Land (SRCCL) approved by the world’s governments on Wednesday in Geneva, Switzerland.

It will be a key scientific input into forthcoming climate and environment negotiations, such as the Conference of the Parties of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (COP14) in New Delhi, India in September and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Santiago, Chile, in December.

“Governments challenged the IPCC to take the first ever comprehensive look at the whole land- climate system. We did this through many contributions from experts and governments worldwide. This is the first time in IPCC report history that a majority of authors – 53% – are from developing countries,” said Hoesung Lee, Chair of the IPCC.

This report shows that better land management can contribute to tackling climate change, but is not the only solution. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors is essential if global warming is to be kept to well below 2oC, if not 1.5oC.

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UN Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, 9 August 2019

UN Photo

This year marks the International Year of Indigenous Languages, declared by the United Nations General Assembly to draw attention to the urgent need to preserve, revitalize and promote indigenous languages.

Languages are how we communicate, and they are inextricably linked to our cultures, histories and identity.  Almost half of the world’s estimated 6,700 languages – of which most are indigenous — are in danger of disappearing.  With every language that disappears, the world loses a wealth of traditional knowledge.

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world.  A significant proportion still lack basic rights, with systematic discrimination and exclusion continuing to threaten ways of life, cultures and identities.  This is contrary to the intent of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with its promise to leave no one behind.

I count on Member States to engage and support indigenous peoples in determining their own development through policies that are inclusive, equitable and accessible.  The United Nations stands ready to support all initiatives aimed at realizing the rights and aspirations of indigenous peoples.

Read about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

 

UN Secretary-General’s Message on World Population Day, 11 July 2019

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is the world’s blueprint for a better future for all on a healthy planet.

On World Population Day, we recognize that this mission is closely interrelated with demographic trends including population growth, ageing, migration and urbanization.

While the world’s population overall continues to increase, this growth is uneven. For many of the world’s least developed countries, the challenges to sustainable development are compounded by rapid population growth as well as vulnerability to climate change. Other countries are facing the challenge of ageing populations, including the need to promote healthy active ageing and to provide adequate social protection. As the world continues to urbanize, with 68% of the world population projected to live in urban areas by 2050, sustainable development and climate change will increasingly depend on the successful management of urban growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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